“…weak upper and lower boy strength [is] associated with depression and anxiety”

“…weak upper and lower boy strength [is] associated with depression and anxiety”

A study in Menopause (2019; doi:10.10.1097/GME.00000000000013550) reminds us – as if we (CrossFitters) didn’t already know – that, among the many other benefits of strength training and gaining muscular strength (like metabolic health and functional independence), being stronger can help reduce depression and anxiety in middle-aged women.

Lifestyle, social and family support, diet and smart exercise all contribute to a healthy life- and health-span.  Knowing that some of the less popular, less mainstream, less “marketed” forms of exercise can sometimes be the most beneficial could improve your quality of life. While “cardio” is important, light weights and cardio alone do not compose the ideal training regime for any age, from young to old. Include strength training in your fitness plan to produce not only mental health benefits but to improve hormones in both men and women, improve bone density, improve body composition (yes, better than cardio!); and according to this study, help improve symptoms of anxiety and depression.